Author: Luke Parker

About Luke Parker

Luke is a passionate young writer who loves film not only for its entertainment value, but because it acts to him as a transport into vast new worlds. Described by many as an old soul, his musical interests lie mainly in the hands of the Fab Four, and his preference for movies does not sit in one decade alone. Simply put, his favorite type of film is a good one. You can find the complete anthology of Luke’s work at his website Dr. Filmlove, where his reviews range from "Taxi Driver" to "Jackass."

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Catwoman (PG-13)

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With no way around it, and at the risk of sounding astonishingly trite, “Catwoman” puts the “cat” in catastrophe. The plot is ludicrous, unengaging, and demeaning; the over-sexualized action scenes are nauseating; and there is absolutely nothing one-named director Pitof or star Halle Berry (who, at this point, has face planted her fall from grace) will […]

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Blade Runner (R)

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Reviewed after viewing of “Blade Runner: The Final Cut.” Ridley Scott crafted the world of “Blade Runner“ just over thirty-five years ago. Its drenched, dystopian forecast of Los Angeles displayed Coca Cola advertisements the size of skyscrapers, and hosted aerial highways for box-shaped cars. There was beauty in the air, but a jungle on the ground. […]

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (NR)

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Weak and conquered, Confederate soldiers march grudgingly through what’s left of a small town. The Man with No Name sits nonchalantly at its hotel, cleaning his pistol, totally oblivious to the three gun-wielding bandits making their way to his door. Outside, the marching halts, amplifying, for a split second, the spurs of one of the […]

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For a Few Dollars More (R)

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With the experience of one Western under his gun belt, Sergio Leone commands his follow up to “A Fistful of Dollars” with a greater sense of purpose and style, building upon his previous film’s extremities in order to expand upon and present his vision of the west more effectually. And though it is more cinematically pleasing […]

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A Fistful of Dollars (R)

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The first of Sergio Leone’s Dollars trilogy, “A Fistful of Dollars” was a cinematic pioneer in many forms. In its story, the villains were sweaty, scruffy, and bloody, and its hero was only a hero by comparison – there are no more white hats and black hats – and culturally, the film’s eventual success marked […]

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The LEGO Batman Movie (PG)

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A great comedian can laugh at himself, and now within the course of a year, two great comedians have emerged to save the dwindling superhero genre: the first was Marvel’s foul-mouthed mercenary, Deadpool, whose quick wit and unconventional approach to crime-fighting ushered in a new and warmly welcomed type of hero (“Deadpool” dominated the box […]

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Frank (R)

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The union between insanity and creativity has long been an intriguing theme for fiction. Many of our most interesting and original entertainers have suffered mental illnesses (a subject which has become increasingly open ever since the untimely and saddening death of Robin Williams), and though Lenny Abrahamson’s “Frank“ was promoted and will be labeled as a […]

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Rocky IV (PG)

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There was a lot of adoration from me for the film’s title character going into “Rocky IV,” adoration that had been influenced by his candid spirit and his immaculate and inspirational journey to the top in the original 1976 picture – the grizzled Philadelphia boxer hosts what is, in my mind, the greatest Cinderella story […]

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The Graduate (NR)

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Ben Braddock may be the most selfish character ever idealized on the screen. An adolescent with no regard for others, he goes from being an indecisive college graduate to a degenerate and sadistic creep. He bulldozes and takes advantage of giving people until they’ve served his purpose, and then, like a packet of ketchup or […]

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Get Out (R)

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A part of what makes first time director Jordan Peele’s spellbinding, intelligent, and important thriller, “Get Out,” so defying is that there is a clear divide between right and wrong that is drawn out by the two colors imprinted on the screen. There’s black, and there’s white, there is right, and there is wrong; the […]

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