Author: Luke Parker

About Luke Parker

Luke is a passionate young writer who loves film not only for its entertainment value, but because it acts to him as a transport into vast new worlds. Described by many as an old soul, his musical interests lie mainly in the hands of the Fab Four, and his preference for movies does not sit in one decade alone. Simply put, his favorite type of film is a good one. You can find the complete anthology of Luke’s work at his website Dr. Filmlove, where his reviews range from "Taxi Driver" to "Jackass."

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The LEGO Batman Movie (PG)

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A great comedian can laugh at himself, and now within the course of a year, two great comedians have emerged to save the dwindling superhero genre: the first was Marvel’s foul-mouthed mercenary, Deadpool, whose quick wit and unconventional approach to crime-fighting ushered in a new and warmly welcomed type of hero (“Deadpool” dominated the box […]

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Frank (R)

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The union between insanity and creativity has long been an intriguing theme for fiction. Many of our most interesting and original entertainers have suffered mental illnesses (a subject which has become increasingly open ever since the untimely and saddening death of Robin Williams), and though Lenny Abrahamson’s “Frank“ was promoted and will be labeled as a […]

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Rocky IV (PG)

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There was a lot of adoration from me for the film’s title character going into “Rocky IV,” adoration that had been influenced by his candid spirit and his immaculate and inspirational journey to the top in the original 1976 picture – the grizzled Philadelphia boxer hosts what is, in my mind, the greatest Cinderella story […]

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The Graduate (NR)

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Ben Braddock may be the most selfish character ever idealized on the screen. An adolescent with no regard for others, he goes from being an indecisive college graduate to a degenerate and sadistic creep. He bulldozes and takes advantage of giving people until they’ve served his purpose, and then, like a packet of ketchup or […]

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Get Out (R)

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A part of what makes first time director Jordan Peele’s spellbinding, intelligent, and important thriller, “Get Out,” so defying is that there is a clear divide between right and wrong that is drawn out by the two colors imprinted on the screen. There’s black, and there’s white, there is right, and there is wrong; the […]

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Road to Perdition (R)

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“Road to Perdition” is reminiscent of a Greek tragedy in that all of its sinners are eventually met with their insufferable fate. Shakespearian tragedies like “Macbeth,” or “Romeo and Juliet” are separated from the Greeks’ because, though the audience knows which characters will live and which will die, there’s excitement in our confusion of how the […]

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Swiss Army Man (R)

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I wonder what has to go through a writer’s mind to come up with “Swiss Army Man:” there would have to be some chasm of depression and isolation, but also a heavy-duty sense of humor and creativity.  I can say I have never seen anything like it, and can be almost certain I never will […]

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The Three Hikers (NR)

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I will be released. What families will do in times of grief to recreate even the slightest moment of bygone happiness is individual and absolute. That simple phrase above is a Bob Dylan lyric which an imprisoned Josh Fattal, one of the ‘Three Hikers,’ told his desperate mother with the little bit of time allotted […]

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Lost in Translation (R)

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Amidst the frantic confusion of the Japanese city lifestyle, two lost people are able to find each other and form a communion that is so genuine, it manipulates itself into a piercingly attractive tragedy. Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson play those two souls who, as they bounce around their Tokyo hotel in the middle of […]

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Delusion (NR)

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“Delusion” wraps itself up entirely into what it wants to become, but in doing so, mistakenly suffocates under the pressure of its own desires. There is a definite presence of failure here; each element of the film conflicts with the others: the performances don’t match up, the dialogue is weak, and worst of all, it’s […]

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